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Social media users mass e-purge friends, family who voted for Trump

In what is quickly becoming a “deleting hate” social media movement, masses of people are purging friends and family from their social media feeds.
Photo credit:
www8.pcmag.com

In what is quickly becoming a “deleting hate” social media movement, masses of people are purging friends and family from their social media feeds.

Over half the country is still jarred as news sinks in that Donald Trump will be leading the most powerful nation in the world.

The LGBT community especially is in shock as they fear some of what Trump and his running mate Mike Pence have said they will do with the LGBT community rings sour as inauguration day creeps ever closer.

Many on social media are outraged at the results and are taking action by removing their conservative friends from their contact lists.

Some are even unfriending family members who gave Trump their vote, saying they can no longer communicate with them because in their eyes they have elected a homophobe, transphobe and xenophobe into the highest position of power.

This e-purge is taking out longtime acquaintances and blood relatives who they feel betrayed them by embracing the GOP.

The digital executioners feel Trump’s win is a personal attack by most of the country, saying those allies who they thought supported them actually did not, and gave their vote to one of the most anti-LGBT candidates in history.  

Facebook especially became enflamed with personal opinions and updates this morning. Users taking to their friends lists and deleting chunks of people from their feeds.

Perhaps this trend didn’t happen during the campaign because many thought a Donald Trump win was slim, therefore entertained their right-wing acquaintances in hopes of swaying them or gloating later.

Some have even gone a step further and deleted people who cast their protest ballots for Gary Johnson.

But the division isn’t just one-sided, Trump supporters appear to be eager to express their great satisfaction that their candidate is set to head the country, staring down their critics with "I told you so" aplomb. 

LGBT Trump supporters seem to be getting the quickest axe, as the community ponders the reasons behind their support of a man who has said he will try and repeal same-sex marriage, and a Vice President who has been labeled the most anti-LGBT politician in history. 

In light of the mass friend editing, people seem to be uniting and focusing on support with those who remain unblocked, creating a net of encouragement for people confused by the election results, keeping the slogan "stronger together" alive and likeable.